HomeNewsArticle Display

Medical readiness remains priority at Robins

Airman 1st Class Brittany Guynn, at right, Public Health Technician, does a blood pressure check on Senior Airman Hannah Pierringer for a preventive health assessment. (U. S. Air Force photo/Sue Sapp)

Airman 1st Class Brittany Guynn, at right, Public Health Technician, does a blood pressure check on Senior Airman Hannah Pierringer for a preventive health assessment. (U. S. Air Force photo/Sue Sapp)

ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, Ga -- Robins has achieved its highest ever individual medical readiness rate - 83.3 percent - which places it among the top of Air Force Materiel Command bases.

The IMR status allows commanders, at any given time, to see how many of their personnel are medically healthy and fit to deploy.

The rate fluctuates daily as people across the base deploy.

"We're just on the cusp of being number one; that's a pretty big deal," said Maj. Karen Kramer, 78th Aerospace Medicine Squadron Public Health Flight commander. "In the last few months we have sustained being number two, but I think it's pretty achievable that we get to number one. It just hasn't happened yet."

There are six different areas of medical readiness that are monitored: dental, immunizations, equipment (for example, gas mask inserts which are required for IMR), a lab, preventive health assessment, and duty limiting conditions.

There are four tiers used in the classification system for reporting IMR, including green (fully medically ready), yellow (due for an update), gray (indeterminate), and red, (not medically ready or overdue).

While Robins has been at the bottom in the past, its numbers have picked up significantly during the past several months, following a deployment LEAN event last June and continued emphasis on Airmen to stay medically ready by leaders.

The IMR rate was further boosted by intensive education and engagement with unit health monitors down to the squadron level, which further enhanced communication and streamlined processes.

"As we're seeing success with our numbers, we are trying to make this process as seamless as possible for units," said Kramer. "What we're doing is working, but we're always looking for ways to improve."

Kramer said sustaining numbers above 80 percent - an Air Force standard - will continue to be challenging.

In the end, it's up to each individual to maintain responsibility for his or her own medical readiness, she said.